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How to Write Emotionally Using a Muse

Byron George
3 min readJul 13, 2021

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Like all artists, be they painters, or sculptors, writers need that little extra to bring out the emotional side and put passion into their best work. I am no different and to get my writing energy level up I need a Muse. I need someone to be there in my head and my heart, a person of desire to inflame the passions and lust brings out the erotic and sensual side of my alter ego, Byron George.

As Brian George the writer of adventures and crime I often need a villainous person as a picture in my head, someone who might have done me harm in the past, who I can get revenge on in my novel. I know that we have to be careful that these real villains are not identifiable, but in some cases, I’ve even felt “so what, sue me,” and “I’ll prove that you really were the shitty person in real life.” As an alternative, my good characters are also representative of people that I loved in the past. Not necessarily as lovers but just as lovely personas. When they do things in the book I try to hear their tone of voice in the dialogue.

When I get real love, then the ‘Muse’ comes into their own, they might not be the character in a novel, or they may even; but they are the incentive, the inspiration that drives me onwards to even more creativity. Then my writing energy takes off into the stratosphere, confidence zooms, and it’s almost a euphoria like a drug high. Like all of us, happiness is a big part of our success, especially at work, and if that work is doing something you love, inspired by someone you actually love, then the passion and emotions show up in the prolific, and the intensity of the work.

It all reminds me of a jokey speech that I used to give in my team-building talks. Where I tell the story of being at an official function in London the night before. The French Ambassador and his wife were the guests of honor. I was seated next to the Ambassadors wife, and we were having a delightful conversation about the philosophy of life, and I asked her, “What do you consider is the most important thing in your life?” It was during one of those moments when everything seems to go quiet, and everybody appears to look at you.

She answered clearly in her beautiful French accent; “A Penis.” The silence was deafening as her husband turned and put his hand gently on her arm and responded.

“Cheri, over ‘ere zey pronounce zat `appiness.”

The previously shocked guests breathed a collective sigh of relief for her embarrassment. She was surely correct in her statement. Maybe for some of us writers of the erotic arts though our ‘Muse’ can have both meanings applied. 😜

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Byron George

Positive & sensual author; loves diversity, travel, other cultures, pan, poly whatever! LGBTQ+ Positive, Growin’ old disgracefully. www.authorbyrongeorge.com